New York City Police Department
Smith & Wesson
"Terrier"


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     This nifty little Smith & Wesson Terrier (pre-Model 32) #67226 was a direct shipment from Smith & Wesson to the New York City Police Department.
    In 1952, the NYCPD's Equipment Bureau sold this gun to Probationary Patrolman James G. Donahue. The sale is recorded in Book 52-55 Series C Page 36 Gun No. 187.
    For a gun that saw about 15 years of duty before being withdrawn from service (.32 caliber revolvers were not permitted after 1967), this gun is in very good shape.
    Notice in the topmost image, and again in the lowermost image, the presence of a circular wear mark on the right sideplate. This wear mark, which I often refer to as the "Silver Doughnut", is caused by the snap on the department authorized off-duty holster rubbing on the gun and wearing away the blue. I've seen this on many guns and it is a very common and usually accurate way of identifying off-duty NYCPD revolvers.
    This gun is fitted with a grip adaptor; an authorized and common modification.
    Extant Terrier sales records are sketchy. the earliest mention of Terriers being sold is 1951, however, it would not surprise me if they were being sold years earlier by the Department. The lowest recorded sale of a Terrier is #10069 in 1951, the second lowest is #31285 that same year. After that, Terrier records are found in the 52xxxx to 68xxx range, with the exception being a rather high #97974. The odd gap between the end of the 68xxx range and the solitary #97974 entry seems to suggest there may have been many more Terrier sales, however I am unable to locate a record of them.
    There are no known records indicating Terrier sales after 1955. This makes sense, as the Chiefs Special (Pre-Model 36) was available by then, and was turning into a very popular seller!
    As with most firearms used by the members of the NYCPD, the Terriers were purchased, NOT issued, to the individual officer. Since this made the gun the personal property of the individual officer, the gun bore no markings to identify it with the NYCPD. Off-duty guns were exempt from the regulations that required one's shield number be stamped on the gun. Thus, it is very hard to  identify an NYCPD Terrier without either a factory letter or a check of the NYCPD records.
    Surviving Terrier records show sales of approximately 1,591 guns.

Terrier Image
Terrier Image


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